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Handy hygiene skills earn nurse some top recognition | Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
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Handy hygiene skills earn nurse some top recognition

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Ground-breaking work promoting infection control and good hand hygiene has earned specialist LPFT nurse Jane Lord, recognition in a national awards ceremony.
 
Jane has been shortlisted for Infection Prevention Nurse of the Year at this year’s British Journal of Nursing Awards.
 
In recent months she’s come up with a number of innovative schemes to raise awareness of the importance of good hand hygiene, even enlisting the help of the Red Arrows to spearhead her crusade across the county.

Pictured above is Jane with Kevin Shaw, Head of Health Protection for Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Groups when she visited the Red Arrows.


The world famous aerobatic display team, along with members of the historic Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) took part in last year’s nationwide Infection Prevention Society Hand Hygiene Torch Relay, and Jane said she was absolutely thrilled to have received their support.   

The relay was a fabulous opportunity to spotlight the importance of hand hygiene, not only for health staff but also for our service users and carers,

she said.

Washing your hands is still the most effective thing anyone can do to prevent the spread of infectious diseases.  To have both the Red Arrows and members of the BBMF on board was an absolute privilege and a truly inspirational way of involving such global icons to raise awareness of the importance of hand hygiene to all of us.

In addition to securing help from the historic aircraft crew, Jane can often be found visiting both inpatient and community teams across the Trust.

My role is about engaging our staff, service users and carers, and encouraging and supporting them to make the small changes that will make a huge difference to those we care for,

added Jane.

Awareness of infection prevention and control is important for everyone and people with mental health problems or a learning disability can feel confident that they are protected from the dangers of infectious disease by the good practices of our staff.

Jane also organised a Trust wide Hand Hygiene Day and encouraged participants to show their support by putting their painted palm prints on a special pledge tree.
 
She was nominated for the award by her line manager Lynda Stockwell, who said that Jane’s boundless enthusiasm was something she would never want to stop the spread of.

Since joining LPFT at the end of August 2016, I have been very impressed with Jane’s sensible and sensitive approach to Infection Prevention and Control,

said Lynda.

As our nurse specialist she is approachable, inclusive, good humoured and creative, and makes a special effort to involve staff and service users.  I believe it’s tremendously important that IPC nursing in mental health and learning disability services is recognised and represented – so fingers crossed for Jane on the night.

Jane will find out is she’s successful at the awards ceremony in London on 10th March.