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Jargon results

Terms / acronyms beginning with 'A'...

  • Assessment Intervention and Moving on (AIM) assessments – this assessment process is used by professionals to assess young people who have committed a sexual assault or harmful sexual behaviour. Through this assessment, professionals will recommend some work together that meet any identified/unmet need that may partly explain the behaviour and/or help reduce likelihood of it happening again.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'C'...

  • The CAHTS Team is an acronym we use to describe the Crisis and Home Treatment Team. This is the team a young person sees if they are experiencing mental health crisis or need more intensive support due to being a risk to themselves.

     

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  • The CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service) Core Team assess and provide therapy for young people (and their families) with moderate to severe mental health difficulties.

     

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  • The EDS Service is a separate service within CAMHS for young people who are experiencing an Eating Disorder like Anorexia Nervosa of Bulimia.

     

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  • A Lead Professional may be called a  care co-ordinator if a  young person is open to the Care Programme Approach (CPA) and/or been in an inpatient hospital. The name reflects that they are the person that has responsibility to make sure that a young person is getting the support and care they need.

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  • A Care plan sets out a young person’s treatment plan. After an initial assessment a young person should agree their care plan with their lead professional. A Care Plan will depend on a young person’s symptoms, needs and personal goals for their mental health/emotional health, but could include 1-1 or group therapy. A Care Plan will be reviewed and will change if a young person’s needs change.

     

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  • CBT is a talking therapy that help manage problems by helping you challenge the way you think and behave. CBT is mainly used to treat anxiety and depression but it can also be used to treat a variety of other difficulties.There are also lots of variations of CBT including Trauma-focused CBT and CBT-E (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Eating Disorders).

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  • A CIN is legally defined as a child who is unlikely to have to opportunity to achieve or maintain a reasonable standard of health and or development without extra services . This is the level  where a Social Worker would typically be involved and there would be regular meetings with social worker and other professionals to make sure a young person is getting the right support.

     

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  • If somebody is under ‘child protection’ it means there is reason to believe the child/young person is at risk of significant harm unless significant changes. A Social Worker would be heavily involved and be coordinating care, and there would be regularly meetings with family, social worker and other professionals to make sure a young person is getting the right support to reduce risk of the child/young person being harmed.

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  • The Care Programme Approach is a package of care that is used to support someone with a mental health condition and aid recovery. If a young person is under CPA, they will have a care plan which identifies  strengths, difficulties, goals and support needs. A young person would have a care coordinator who would monitor a young person’s care and support.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'D'...

  • DBT is another type of talking therapy that was adapted from CBT but it is used for people who feel very intense emotions. In CAMHS we also run DBT skills group where young people learn skills together to cope with such difficulties.

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  • Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP) is a form of psychotherapy that can help form and repair connections and attachment between children, young people and their parent/carers. This type of therapy can help children/young people who find it hard to feel safe and secure with parents, due to difficult or traumatic early life experiences. These early experiences can result in the young person experiencing high levels of anxiety that result in them wanting to control  their relationships and struggle with their emotions. This type of therapy involves working closely with parents/carers to help young person feel more emotionally secure.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'E'...

  • An Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire is a questionnaire all about how an eating disorder affects you day to day. By completing it at the start of therapy and then every 28 days it tracks your recovery.

     

     

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  • EFA is a group delivered by the Crisis and Home Treatment Service (C&HTS) within CAMHS.  The purpose of this group is to teach young people/their families how to cope and soothe harmful emotions/negative feelings. It is aimed to teach young people how to reduce stress and crisis levels within yourself without the need for outside agencies.  Parent EFA is a very similar group but it is delivered to the parents of the young person that is in need of support.

     

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  • EMDR helps with disturbing thoughts and feelings that may occur if you have experienced a traumatic event. EMDR helps the brain reprocess memories of a traumatic event so you can let go of them.

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  • This is a questionnaire given to young people and families to enable them to  have their say and share their experience of service, including whether they are satisfied with the service.

     

     

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  • Making sure that the work we do is Evidence Based, is how the NHS makes sure you are getting the best possible care that is shown to have worked to help people feel better in the past. This means that there is current medical/scientific evidence for what services offer.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'F'...

  • Family based treatment is a talking which aims  to prevent young people with Eating Disorders (Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa) having to go into hospital by assisting parents/carers to help their adolescent in recovery and help them get back to their normal adolescent life.

     

     

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  • A formulation can be created at the start of treatment. It aims to help a young person understand and make sense of their difficulties and symptoms, considering a young person’s environment, relationships, social relationships and past life events. A formulation can then be used to develop a care plan and treatment 

     

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  • Future 4 me is a service in Lincolnshire that supports young people who may  be at risk of being in the criminal justice system and/or committing crimes. Through providing support and working with these young people, the hope is that it will reduce crime and protect victims.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'G'...

  • Graded Exposure may be done as a part of CBT therapy if you are struggling with issues such as anxiety. It involves a process called ‘habituation’ which refers to how you/your bodys get used to things the more you do them/expose yourself to them. It may start with writing down a ‘ladder’ of things that you find worrying/difficult ('least' at the bottom, 'most' at the bottom). Then, the clinician will help you work up the ladder, moving up as you feel more able to do each thing on your list.

     

     

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  • Group facilitators are practitioners that run and deliver group sessions. 

     

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'I'...

  • An Initial Assessment is usually the first appointment a young person will have with CAMHS. For more information, visit our website page detailing what sorts of things you may be asked in that appointment

     

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  • Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescence (IPT-A) is an evidence-based approach to treat depression. The main goal of IPT-A is to decrease symptoms of depression, increase the young person’s social activity and improve the quality of their relationships and social interactions.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'L'...

  • A Lead professional is the person that oversees a young person’s care and is the main point of contact for that person throughout their time in CAMHS  (though there may be other professionals supporting that young person).

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'M'...

  • An Multi- disciplinary assessment is where a group of different professionals come together to meet with a child/young person and family to assess current difficulties, including mental health needs. By having different professionals from different disciplines in this first assessment, different perspective and ideas can be discussed together with the family, helping make sure the young person gets the best treatment possible.

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  • An MDT is a group of different professionals (e.g. nurses, social worker, psychiatrists) who together discuss and make decisions on recommended treatment.

     

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'O'...

  • The Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and Child Outcome Rating Scale (CORS) are measures that are used to monitor children’s, young people and their families feedback on progress. In session the clinician will ask the young person to rate 4 different areas of their life on a 10cm scale (left hand of scale being the lowest, right being the highest). Through completing every session, the clinician and young person can assess progress, including the impact of therapy. 

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'P'...

  • Treatment pathways, also referred to as just ‘pathways.’  In Lincolnshire CAMHS Pathways help a clinician build or guide a young person’s care plan and are based on recommended treatment and medical guidelines. In CAMHS there are a number of different pathways depending on what a young person is struggling with e.g. low mood pathway, social anxiety pathway and eating disorder pathway.

     

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  • Peer Support workers (PSW) are members of staff with lived experience of CAMHS and mental health difficulties, who use their personal experiences and insight to support young people in CAMHS. Because of their lived experience, some describe PSW’s as ’bridging the gap’ between the clinician and person. A PSW may help plan and deliver care, help young people attend groups or go out in your community to help promote recovery.

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  • Psychiatrists are medical doctors  who have chosen to specialise in mental health. Psychiatrists may provide a diagnostic category (diagnosis) to describe a mental health problem and are able to prescribe medication if this is deemed appropriate. As they have a background in general medicine, part of what they may do is consider if a physical illness may have a role to play in how a young person is feeling.

     

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  • The Psychologists at CAMHS are clinical or counselling psychologists. Psychologists have received background training in academic psychology, the study of the mind and behaviour. Throughout their doctoral training they have developed skills in complex assessment and formulation of mental health and behavioural difficulties. Psychologists may provide one to one therapy, but are also trained to work with families, groups and consult with other professionals. 

     

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'R'...

  • This is a parent group held in CAMHS which presents a philosophy for creating healthy relationships with children and young people through increased awareness and understanding of emotional dynamics in relationships.

     

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  • The RCADS is a questionnaire that measures symptoms of anxiety and depression, and can be used to track changes in these symptoms over time.

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  • Referrals are a formal process that happens when a person asks a service for help. Young people may get referred to CAMHS by a doctor, teacher or maybe even  refer themselves.  When ever one of these happens, paperwork needs to be filled out describing what the issues the young person experiencing are and what they need help with. If CAMHS isn’t right for a young person, a clinician may make a referral to another service that is more appropriate.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'S'...

  • Family Therapy is exactly like it sounds. This involves  your  family. It enables you and your family to express and explore difficult  emotions and thoughts safely with the support of the therapist. The aim is to help family members understand each other’s experiences and views, appreciate each other’s needs, build on family strengths and make useful changes in their relationships and their lives

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  • A SRS is a measure that used to monitor and review the relationship  and dynamic between the clinician and the young person. This is important as we know that this can have a big impact on a young person’s experience of therapy and whether it makes a difference.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'T'...

  • A TAC is a team of professionals that work with a you and your family this team of professionals may include people from school, CAMHS and  early help workers. These people meet up with you and your family to discuss what care will be best appropriate for you to meet your needs.

     

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  • Theraplay-informed therapy is designed to build and enhance a child’s attachment, self-esteem, trust in others, and ability to enjoy play. In treatment the therapist will guide the parent/carer through playful fun games, developmentally challenging activities, and nurturing activities.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'U'...

  • Universal services are services that are provided to all children, young people and families e.g. schools, GP’s. In CAMHS we typically ask that young people and family access support from a universal service before being referred to CAMHS. This is because there are usually services out there that can support young people’s emotional wellbeing before it gets to the stage where they would need to come to a mental health service.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'W'...

  • Watchful waiting is when a professional in CAMHS, or maybe another professional such as your GP, is keeping an eye on you but you wont necessarily be doing a piece of active therapy work with you. Watchful waiting is used to find out a little bit more about how you may be doing, what that means for you, and how things change over time.

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