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Jargon results

Terms / acronyms beginning with 'A'...

  • AIM (Assessment Intervention and Moving on) assessments – This assessment process is used by professionals to assess young people who have committed a sexual assault or harmful sexual behaviour. Through this assessment, professionals will recommend a programme of work together to meet any identified/unmet need that may partly explain the behaviour, and/or help reduce the likelihood of it happening again.

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  • If needed, when a young person reaches 18, their CAMHS team will help them prepare to move (transition) to Adult Mental Health Services. There may be some instances where this may be earlier than 18, or later than 18, depending on individual circumstance. 

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'B'...

  • Behavioural activation is an evidence-based treatment often used to treat depression/low mood. It encourages a person to develop or get back into activities which are meaningful to them.

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  • When the amount of food eaten is viewed as excessive and the person has felt a loss of control at the time of eating.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'C'...

  • CAMHS is an acronym for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

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  • The EDS Service is a separate service within CAMHS for young people who are experiencing an Eating Disorder, such as Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia.

     

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  • CAMHS Learning Disability team is a community based specialist service offering support to children and young people, aged between 0 to 18 years, who are experiencing significant mental health problems and who are diagnosed with moderate to severe learning disability. We can help with mental health and associated complex needs, and challenging behaviour.

    Please visit our CAMHS webpage to find out more.

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  • A Lead Professional may be called a care co-ordinator if a young person is open to the CPA (Care Programme Approach) and/or been in an inpatient hospital. The name reflects that they are the person that has responsibility to make sure that a young person is getting the support and care they need.

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  • A Care Plan is a child/young person's treatment plan that is tailored to suit their specific needs, personal goals, and symptoms. It specifies the care a child/young person needs to develop socially, emotionally, physically, and intellectually. This Care Plan should be agreed on with both the Lead Professional and Young Person, and can be reviewed and changed if needed. 

     

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  • CBT is a talking therapy that helps manage problems by helping you challenge the way you think and behave. CBT is mainly used to treat anxiety and depression but it can also be used to treat a variety of other difficulties. There are also lots of variations of CBT including Trauma-focused CBT and CBT-E (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Eating Disorders).

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  • The CAMHS Crisis and Enhanced Treatment Teams (CCETT) are based in Lincoln and Boston and cover the whole county.

    The staff members are from various backgrounds including:

    • social work
    • nursing
    • occupational therapy
    • support workers.

    We aim to support young people in a mental health crisis through providing assessment and intensive home treatment. This includes supporting young people experiencing thoughts of suicide and engaging in significant self harming behaviours. 

    By working with young people and their families and carers, we aim to avoid hospital admission wherever possible by providing intensive support in the home environment.  

    Please visit our CAMHS webpage to find out more.

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  • CEDS is an acronym for Community Eating Disorder Service.

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  • A CIN is legally defined as a child who is unlikely to have the opportunity to achieve or maintain a reasonable standard of health and/or development without extra services. This is the level where a social worker would typically be involved and there would be regular meetings with the social worker and other professionals to make sure a young person is getting the right support.

     

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  • Clinical lead practitioners are senior clinicians within a team.  They will often offer supervision to staff within their team and have a lot of clinical experience, meaning they can offer a range of interventions to young people and their families.

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  • The Complex Needs Service (CNS) is a team of experienced and specialist clinicians who provide consultancy, psychological formulation, specialist assessment, supervision and training for professionals involved with young people who have complex and specific areas of need. We use a trauma-informed approach and aim to work collaboratively with the professional network around a child, so that everyone involved can share relevant information and develop understanding of the child's needs in relation to their life experiences, development, their relationships with their parents or caregivers and their family, as well as the current difficulties.

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  • Core CAMHS is a team of trained Mental Health Practitioners and Assistant Practitioners from various clinical backgrounds. These include:

    • Mental Health Nurses
    • Social Workers
    • Psychologists
    • Psychiatrists.

    This is the team you would usually see on your first visit to CAMHS, unless you accessed our service at a period of crisis. This team works with:

    • children
    • young people
    • parents & carers

    to assess the mental health of children and adolescents who have been identified as potentially having moderate to severe mental health needs.

    Please visit our CAMHS webpage to find out more.

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  • If a young person is under ‘child protection’ it means there is reason to believe that the child/young person is at risk of significant harm unless significant changes are made to prevent this. A social worker would be heavily involved and be coordinating care, and there would be regular meetings with family, social worker and other professionals to make sure a young person is getting the right support to reduce the risk of the child/young person being harmed.

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  • The Care Programme Approach is a package of care that is used to support someone with a mental health condition and aid recovery. If a young person is under CPA, they will have a care plan which identifies strengths, difficulties, goals and support needs. A young person would also have a care coordinator who would work with the young person to monitor their care and support.

     

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  • CYP relates to children and young people from birth until their 18th birthday. Once a child is 18 years of age they are legally an adult. This term is often used to describe the children and young people we support in our services.

    Across all of our services our priority is to support children and young people to improve their overall health and well-being and to enable them to have a good quality of life and to feel valued and understood.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'D'...

  • DBT is another type of talking therapy that was adapted from CBT but it is used for people who feel very intense emotions. In CAMHS we also run DBT skills groups where young people learn skills together to cope with such difficulties.

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  • Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is a form of psychotherapy that can help form and repair connections and attachment between children, young people and their parent/carers. This type of therapy can help children/young people who find it hard to feel safe and secure with parents, due to difficult or traumatic early life experiences. These early experiences can result in the young person experiencing high levels of anxiety that result in them wanting to control their relationships and struggle with their emotions. This type of therapy involves working closely with parents/carers to help the young person feel more emotionally secure.

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  • A manual used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose mental disorders. The latest version, the DSM-5, was publshed in 2013.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'E'...

  • An Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire is a questionnaire all about how an Eating Disorder affects you day to day. By completing it at the start of therapy, and then every 28 days, it tracks your recovery.

     

     

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  • A diagnostic term used in the fourth edition of the DSM (DSM-IV) to refer to eating disorders that did not fit all the symptoms of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa.

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  • EMHP is an acronym for Education Mental Health Practitioner. Education mental health practitioners (EMHPs) are trained to assess and support children and young people (CYP) with a range of Low Intensity interventions, primarily in a school or college setting that are based on cognitive behavioural therapy. Students will be expected to attend university during the training year – approximately 2 days a week.

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  • EFA is a group delivered by the  CCETTs Team (CAMHS Crisis and Enhanced Treatment Team) within CAMHS. The purpose of this group is to teach young people/their families how to cope and soothe distressing emotions/negative feelings. It is aimed to teach young people how to self-manage and reduce stress and crisis levels. Parent EFA is a very similar group, but it is delivered to the parents of the young person in need of support.

     

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  • EMDR helps with disturbing thoughts and feelings that may occur if you have experienced a traumatic event. EMDR helps the brain reprocess memories of a traumatic event so you can let go of them.

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  • This is a questionnaire given to young people and their families to enable them to have their say and share their experience of service, including whether they are satisfied with the service.

     

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'F'...

  • FBT is a common variant of eating-disorder-focused family therapy.

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  • A formulation aims to help a young person understand and make sense of their difficulties and symptoms, considering their environment, relationships, social relationships and past life events. A formulation can then be used to develop a care plan and treatment. 

     

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  • Future 4 me is a service in Lincolnshire that supports young people who may be at risk of being in the criminal justice system and/or committing crimes. Through providing support and working with these young people, the hope is that it will reduce crime and protect victims.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'G'...

  • A GP is a Doctor based within the community that treats people with mild and chronic illnesses and/or common medical conditions. If needed, a GP can refer people to other health services, including mental health services, if they feel that person needs urgent or specialist support.

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  • Graded Exposure may be recommended as a part of CBT if young people are struggling with issues such as anxiety or phobias. Graded exposure may start with writing down a ‘ladder’ of feared situations /objects/activities that a young person might be avoiding (least feared at the bottom, most feared at the top). Then, the clinician will help the young person work up the ladder, helping expose them to these feared situation in a safe way in order to overcome anxiety. 

     

     

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  • Group facilitators are practitioners that run and deliver group sessions. 

     

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'H'...

  • Healthy Minds Lincolnshire provide support and treatment for children, young people and their families, who are experiencing emotional wellbeing difficulties. The team supports children and young people up to 19 years old. If they have a special educational need or disability or are a care leaver, they can see them up to the age of 25.

    Please visit our Healthy Minds webpage to find out more.

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  • The clinician provides treatment and support in the patient's home.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'I'...

  • A classification and diagnostic tool, published by the World Health Organisation (WHO). The latest version is the ICD-11.

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  • An Initial Assessment is usually the first appointment a young person will have with a service. For more information, visit our website page 'my first appointment' detailing what sorts of things you may be asked in that appointment.

     

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  • The patient stays overnight in a specialist hospital to help provide more intensive treatment and keep them safe.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'L'...

  • A temporary setback or slip. A lapse can be used as learning points to help the person understand more about their triggers.

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  • A Lead professional is the person that oversees a young person’s care and is the main point of contact for that person throughout their time in CAMHS (though there may be other professionals supporting that young person).

     

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  • A Learning Disability Nurse works to provide specialist healthcare and support to children and young people with a learning disability, as well as their families and staff teams, to help them live a fulfilling life.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'M'...

  • A Multi- disciplinary assessment is where a group of different professionals come together to meet with a child/young person and their family to assess current difficulties, including mental health needs. By having different professionals from different disciplines in this first assessment, different perspectives and ideas can be discussed together with the family, helping make sure the young person gets the best treatment possible.

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  • An MDT is a group of different professionals (e.g. nurses, social worker, psychiatrists) who discuss and make decisions on recommended treatment together.

     

     

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  • MHST is an acronym for Mental Health Support Team. The Mental Health Support Team work in schools and colleges with children and young people aged 5 – 18. MHST aims to help children and young people and their parents / carers in the self-management of their recovery in groups or in one-to-one meetings.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'N'...

  • Evidence-based recommendations for health and care in England. They are normally also considered relevant in the rest of the UK.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'O'...

  • The ORS (Outcome Rating Scale) and CORS (Child Outcome Rating Scale) are measures that are used to monitor children’s, young people's and their family's feedback on progress. In session, the clinician will ask the young person to rate 4 different areas of their life on a 10cm scale (left hand of scale being the lowest, right being the highest). Through completing these every session, the clinician and young person can assess progress, including the impact of therapy. 

     

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  • The patient is an outpatient so does not have to stay the night as part of their treatment (unlike in inpatient treatment).

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'P'...

  • In Lincolnshire CAMHS treatment 'pathways' help a clinician build or guide a young person’s care plan and are based on recommended treatment and medical guidelines. In CAMHS there are a number of different pathways depending on what a young person is struggling with e.g. low mood pathway, social anxiety pathway and eating disorder pathway.

     

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  • A PBSP Plan is designed to improve the quality of a young person's life by identifying factors that can trigger and lead to challenging behaviours. The PBSP will suggest things that could be used to calm or redirect the young person's thoughts or actions into a more positive outcome. 

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  • Clinicians, also called Practitioners, all help to plan and deliver care, treatment or therapy. Practitioners may have a background in nursing, social work or psychology. These people may also be called  lead professional, care coordinator or group facilitator . 

     

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  • PSW's are members of staff with lived experience of mental health difficulties, who use their personal experiences and insight to support young people in Children and Young People's Mental Health Services. Because of their lived experience, some describe PSW’s as ’bridging the gap’ between the clinician and young person. A PSW may help plan and deliver care, help young people attend groups or go out in your community to help promote recovery.

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  • Psychiatrists are medical doctors who have chosen to specialise in mental health. Psychiatrists may provide a diagnostic category (diagnosis) to describe a mental health problem and are able to prescribe medication if this is deemed appropriate. As they have a background in general medicine, part of what they may do is consider if a physical illness may have a role to play in how a young person is feeling.

     

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  • An intervention where information is offered to the patient and their carers to help them learn more about the psychological disorder, for example, symptoms and treatment.

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  • The Psychologists at CAMHS are clinical or counselling psychologists. Psychologists have received background training in academic psychology, the study of the mind and behaviour. Throughout their doctoral training they have developed skills in complex assessment and formulation of mental health and behavioural difficulties. Psychologists may provide one to one therapy, but are also trained to work with families, groups and consult with other professionals. 

     

     

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  • When the person tries to get rid of the food they have eaten, for example, through vomiting, taking laxatives or diuretics, excessive exercise or fasting.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'R'...

  • RAP is a way of thinking and set of strategies that are particularly useful for challenging or intense children (but also tremendously valuable for all children). Our RAP group in CAMHS introduces  a philosophy for creating healthy relationships with children and young people through encouraging increased awareness and understanding of the emotional dynamics in relationships

     

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  • The RCADS is a questionnaire that measures symptoms of anxiety and depression, and can be used to track changes in these symptoms over time.

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  • Offer direct therapeutic work to children and young people using high intensity Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). 

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  • A rare but critical complication that can occur when someone who is malnourished begins to eat again. Blood tests can be used to check for this.

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  • A referral is a formal process that happens when a person asks a service for help. Young people may get referred to mental health services by a doctor, teacher or maybe they even refer themselves. To do this, paperwork needs to be completed describing the issues a young person is experiencing and what they need help with. 

     

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  • The person slips back completely into their behaviours. Relapses can be used as learning points to help the person understand more about their triggers.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'S'...

  • Family Therapy is exactly like it sounds; it is a type of therapy that involves the wider family. It is designed to enable young people and their family to express and explore difficult emotions and thoughts safely with the support of a therapist. The aim is to help family members understand each other’s experiences and views, appreciate each other’s needs, build on family strengths and make useful changes in their relationships and their lives.

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  • A SRS is a measure used to monitor and review the relationship and dynamic between the clinician and the young person. This is important as we know that this can have a big impact on a young person’s experience of therapy and whether it makes a difference.

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  • A widely used type of antidepressant.

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  • STAMP aims to support children and young people with Autism, a Learning Disability, or both, who are prescribed psychotropic medicines (psychotropic describes any drug that affects behaviour, mood, thoughts, or perception). It helps ensure they have these medicines for the right reasons in the shortest amount of time possible. 

    STAMP also empowers children and young people along with parents and carers to be involved in the decision making when starting, reducing or stopping the medication.  Alternative non-medication treatments are considered and the support available to the children and young people.

     

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  • There are lots or organisations involved in Stopping over medicating people with a Learning Disability, Autism (or both) with psychotropic medicines.  Psychotropic describes any drug that affects behavior, mood, thoughts, or perception). These organisations are working to help  these medicines when they are been over used and helping people to stay well and healthy.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'T'...

  • A TAC is a team of professionals that work with a young person and their family. This team of professionals may include people from school, CAMHS and Early Help Workers. These people meet up with you and your family to discuss what care will be best appropriate for you to meet your needs.

     

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  • Therapies that involve talking to a trained professional about what is going on for the person and their difficulties.

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  • Theraplay-informed therapy is designed to build and enhance a child’s attachment, self-esteem, trust in others, and ability to enjoy play. During treatment the therapist will guide the parent/carer through playful, developmentally challenging and nurturing activities and games.

     

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'U'...

  • Universal Services are services provided to all children, young people and families e.g. schools and GP’s. In CAMHS we typically ask that young people and family access support from a universal service before being referred to CAMHS. This is because there are usually services out there that can support young people’s emotional wellbeing before it gets to the stage where they would need to come to a mental health service.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'W'...

  • Watchful waiting is when a professional in CAMHS, or maybe another professional such as your GP, is keeping an eye on you over a period of time. Watchful waiting is typically used as part of an ongoing assessment i.e. to find out a little bit more about how you may be doing /coping, and what that means for you.

     

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  • If someone is underweight, it is necessary for them to restore weight to become a healthy weight. The word "restore" is often preferable to the word "gain" when discussing weight, as "restoring" can feel more contained and medically necessary, compared to "gaining", which is often equated to becoming fat.

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  • A whole school approach means that all parts of the school organisation work together and are committed to promoting mental health.  This approach promotes understanding of mental health difficulties and aims to reduce the stigma around this, encouraging people to come forward for support when they need it.

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Terms / acronyms beginning with 'Other'...

  • A measure of children's body weight as a percentage of their ideal weight for their height, gender and age.

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